Quentin Tarantino calls Uma Thurman car crash biggest regret of his life

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Director Quentin Tarantino (L) and actress Uma Thurman pose on the red carpet they arrive for the screening of the film "Sils Maria" (Clouds of Sils Maria) in competition at the 67th Cannes Film Festival in Cannes May 23, 2014. REUTERS/Regis Duvignau

Director Quentin Tarantino has admitted that he was responsible for convincing actress Uma Thurman to perform a car stunt for “Kill Bill Vol. 2” that resulted in a car crash, saying it was the biggest regret of his life.

The car crash, which resulted in permanent damage to Thurman’s neck and knees, happened in Mexico near the end of the filming for the 2004 film. Thurman recounted the accident in a recently published New York Times story, which centered on her accusing disgraced movie producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault.

According to Thurman, she had expressed reluctance to drive the car down the sandy road and had asked that a stunt driver do it in her place. She said she had been warned that the car was not operating correctly after its transmission was reconfigured from manual to automatic.

However, her request for a stunt driver was denied, and “Kill Bill” director Tarantino insisted that she drive the car, convincing her that it was safe.

“She believed me, because she trusted me,” Tarantino said. “I told her it would be OK. I told her the road was a straight line. I told her it would be safe. And it wasn’t. I was wrong.”

Tarantino describes the accident as the biggest regret of his life. “It was heartbreaking,” the director explained. “Beyond one of the biggest regrets of my career, it is one of the biggest regrets of my life.”

The footage of the crash was recently made public by Thurman after over a decade of what she calls a cover-up by the producers of the film.

Thurman posted the video on Instagram, saying in the caption that Tarantino gave her the footage so she could expose it. She commended the courage of the director and said she holds Lawrence Bender, E. Bennett Walsh, and Harvey Weinstein responsible for covering up the tragedy.

“They lied, destroyed evidence, and continue to lie about the permanent harm they caused and then chose to suppress,” Thurman wrote. “The cover-up did have malicious intent, and shame on these three for all eternity.”