Bisexuality study news: Rate higher in women than in men, U.S. survey indicates

0

Bisexuality is now on the rise in the United States, according to a new study. The survey shows that the said changes are more prone to women than men.

A study led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests that the number of people who have sexual activity with both male and female are now increasing in number in the said region. The latest national survey also shows that there are a lot of women who say that they are bisexual, compared to men.

The survey was conducted by examining more than 9,000 individuals in the U.S. The participants, who were between the age of 18 and 44, were asked concerning their sexual experiences. The said study was supervised from 2011 to 2013, as a part of the CDCP’s National Survey of Family Growth. 

Each of the subjects were questioned whether they are attracted to the opposite or the same sex. At the same time, they were also asked whether they identify themselves as being bisexual (gay/lesbian) or straight. 

The survey displays that the 17.4 percent of women who have experienced same-sex interaction in their lives are three times higher compared to men, which is at 6.2 percent. Around 5.5 percent of the interviewed women admitted that they are bisexuals compared to the 2 percent of men who put the same label to themselves.

In a statement, Debby Herbenick, an associate professor at the Indiana University who is also the author of the book “Sex Made Easy,” explained the result of the said survey.

“It’s certainly not a new idea that women and men may be attracted to more than gender. But that doesn’t mean it’s an easy orientation to adopt. Women and men who self-identify as bisexual experience stigma not just from heterosexuals but also homosexuals,” stated the professor in a report by CNN.

On the other hand, Ritch Savin Williams, a professor of developmental psychology at Cornell University told NJ.com that the result of the survey is quite astonishing, stating that there’s a progression away from straightness.